Should electric and gas utility companies be allowed to operate as “monopolies?”?

Question by Stan Jasek: Should electric and gas utility companies be allowed to operate as “monopolies?”?
In America we preach the principles of freedom of choice, free enterprise, the power of the individual, and democracy. Yet, when it comes to chosing an electric or gas utility, most Americans only have one choice, dealing with a “monopoly” utility provider. Is this acceptable in today’s world? Most energy providers do not allow the customer to pick whether they want “dirty” energy, “clean” energy, or any other options. We have to accept what they want to provide to us. Is this fair business practice for the 21st century?

Best answer:

Answer by craftyjem719
NO it’s horrible the monopoly they have going.

Know better? Leave your own answer in the comments!

How much does a Nissan leaf and cost to Operate? And is it possible to get a level 2 charger for the car?

Question by Wesley!!!: How much does a Nissan leaf and cost to Operate? And is it possible to get a level 2 charger for the car?
Im aware of the price But i cant find how much it will cost me on my electric bill to charge it. If I do get a Leaf i will get the Level 2 leaf.

I drive AT MOST 60 miles a day 6 days a week from home to work then to school.
I live in Texas and TXU is our energy provider
i want

Best answer:

Answer by apeweek
The cost to drive a Leaf will depend on your local cost of electricity.
*
Nissan Leaf has an energy efficiency of 4 miles per kilowatt-hour. An average price for electricity in the USA is 11 cents per kilowatt-hour. However, most electric utilities offer a lower off-peak rate to electric car users when they charge their cars overnight. The overnight rate in my city is 6 cents per KWH.
*
6 cents divided by 4 miles equals a cost-per-mile of just 1.5 cents.
*
Compare this to the cost of gasoline. If gasoline costs about $ 4 per gallon, I could drive 266 miles for what you might otherwise spend on just one gallon of gas.
*
As you can see, the equivalent MPG above will vary a lot depending on the costs of electricity and gasoline. If you pay 12 cents per KWH of electricity, for example, your equivalent mileage is 133 MPG instead.
*
Or, if gasoline ever gets up to $ 5 per gallon, my cost-equivalent mileage becomes 333 MPG. (Note: the MPGe number you see on electric cars is used for comparing cars, but it doesn’t represent actual cost savings – those need to be calculated individually, as I have done here.)
*
Nissan has a level-2 charger, or you could shop for a different one – do a search on Amazon.com, for example.

What do you think? Answer below!